Home » According to a survey led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

According to a survey led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Semon, Steve Bayer, V. Lorraine Cheek, Kerry W. Gateley, Kathryn M. Lanza, Jane A. Norbin, Catherine C. Jonathan and Slemp Links. The research was funded by CDC’s Centers for Public Health Preparedness plan, and by CDC’s Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers plan.. 1 in 6 community health workers wouldn’t normally report to work during a pandemic flu emergency Approximately 1 in 6 public health workers said they would not report to work throughout a pandemic flu emergency no matter its severity, according to a survey led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The results certainly are a significant improvement over a 2005 research executed by the same analysis team, in which a lot more than 40 % of public wellness employees said these were unlikely to report to work during a pandemic emergency.Approximately one quarter of the sufferers had a analysis of heart failure, myocardial infarction, or renal insufficiency. At medical center discharge, 48.1 percent of the individuals acquired mild or no neurologic disability, and all of those other patients had moderate-to-severe disability or were in a coma or vegetative state. More than half the individuals were discharged to an inpatient skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility, 40.0 percent were discharged home, and 4.8 percent visited hospice, with the discharge destination differing based on the demographic characteristics of the individuals and other variables . Outcomes The overall rate of survival after hospital discharge was 82.0 percent at 30 days, 72.0 percent at 3 months, 58.5 percent at 12 months, and 49.).